FAQ

WHAT IS SSO AND WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT?


SSO stands for Sanitary Sewer Overflow, which occurs when a mixture of rainwater, groundwater, and untreated sewage is discharged into the environment before it reaches a water treatment facility. One of the main causes of SSO is draining fats, oils, and grease (FOG) into sinks instead of proper recycling or disposing of them.

Pouring used cooking oil down the drain of a sink can have serious negative effects. Once leftover grease reaches the sewer system, it hardens inside sewer pipes resulting in clogging and the blockage of untreated sewage. If cities fail to routinely clean and inspect the sewage system or there is a heavy rainfall, the buildup of harmful sewage water can overflow into streets, basements, and can contaminate water sources.

SSO can be identified if there is a build up of unsanitary water flowing out of a manhole or drain accompanied by a foul odor. When there is a large storm, the excess water can enter sewage pipes instead of its designated storm sewer pipes, creating an overflow of untreated sewage. Read more…

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GREASE TRAPS AND GREASE CONTAINERS?

Grease traps and grease containers sound as though they would perform similar functions. While both hold grease, they each serve different purposes. While all grease-producing businesses require a grease trap, the grease container is optional.

So what’s the difference between a grease trap and a grease container?

A grease trap is often located beneath the sink or outside underground. It “traps” the grease as the kitchen wastewater flows through. The grease floats to the top, allowing the “filtered” water to continue to the sewer line. Grease traps are subject to strict state and federal regulations; in fact, most municipalities require grease traps to be cleaned regularly by a professional or they will risk being fined. Read more…

WHAT IS A GREASE TRAP?

A grease trap is a device that wastewater flows through prior to entering the sanitary sewer system. As its name insinuates, the contraption “traps” fats, oils and grease (FOG), preventing it from flowing down the sewer line and clogging it. When the wastewater goes through the grease trap, the FOG rises to the surface floating on top of the water. The FOG is then trapped inside the grease trap while the rest of the sanitary water exits into the sewer line.

Why do I need a grease trap?

Without a grease trap installed in your kitchen, FOG can easily flow into sewer lines. When grease hardens and builds up in the line, it can cause a blockage. A blocked sewer line can result in overflows of wastewater. These sewer water overflows can flow into local bodies of water, contaminating them with harmful bacteria and pollutants. The overflows can also cause damage to properties and homes. Read more…

8 WAYS TO PREVENT OIL THEFT

You may not really realize it, but that used cooking oil of yours is incredibly valuable. It can be recycled and converted into so many other useful things, including biodiesel. Thieves are well aware of how useful and valuable your used cooking oil is, and they’ll go to great lengths to steal it from under your nose.

Don’t let those thieves win! Protect yourself, your company, and your used cooking oil by following these 8 quick and easy ways you can help prevent oil theft at your place of business! Read more…